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Indoor plants watering tips

Indoor plants watering tips



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Gardening Help Search. Bottom watering is appropriate for some plants such as African violets, which can be damaged by water on their leaves. To water from the bottom, set the pot in a tray of water and wait for the water to be drawn up and saturate the soil. Then, dispose of any excess. Ordinary tap water, well water, rain water, and snow melt are all okay to use if warmed to room temperature.

Content:
  • Why does my plant look sad? 6 tips for raising happy houseplants
  • How to Keep Your Plants Watered While You’re on Holiday
  • The Sneaky Way to Water Your Houseplants (and Why They Love the Shower)
  • Indoor Plant Care: How to Water Your Houseplants Properly
  • How to Water Your Indoor Plants The Right Way
  • Houseplant Primer: A Guide to Basic Care and Durable Plants
  • How to Water Houseplants (and How to Know if You're Overwatering)
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Houseplant 101: How to Water Houseplants Properly — Ep 120

Why does my plant look sad? 6 tips for raising happy houseplants

How often should I water my plants? Is a question we're frequently asked. To answer this you need to understand that without water a houseplant will die - This is a fundamental principle of all plants, it's especially important with houseplants as they don't have access to natural sources of water, and therefore depend completely on us to get it right.

That said most plant death is actually caused by too little water It's a fine balancing act and this guide will help you understand how to get it right. Houseplant's are not keen on strict routine. Yes, you may hear your neighbour Jane saying she waters all her plants heavily every Sunday morning without fail, or Uncle Chris might swear his success is down to watering sparingly every Tuesday and Friday evening. However the fact remains that often such routines are unlikely to work long term and are only setting you up for problems later on.

Each plant has their own likes and dislikes when it comes to watering, even two plants of the same type could have differences. For example their location and their size will vary and effect how much water they need. Unfortunately the answer to this usually comes down to experience and practice. There isn't a hard and fast rule to follow, it's a simple case of observing your plant, and interacting with it. By "interacting" we mean touching the soil surface and just below that to see if it is moist or dry.

If the soil surface and the first inch below is dry, it's likely time to water your houseplant. If the soil surface is still damp, no more water is needed.

If your plant's not too big or heavy you can also pick it up; a pot or container which is heavily saturated with water will be much heavier than a pot which has completely dried out. There are also instruments you can buy which beep or light up when it's time to water again. Of all the methods and tricks people suggest the weight of the pot is by far our favorite one.

Once you've done it a few times you will " just know " by it's weight how much water is left accessible for the plant and you will be able to gauge if it needs to be left alone, or if it needs a top up or a soaking.

Look for your particular houseplant in our Hub section of the website to understand its individual watering needs. When you've understood this, there are a few other things to consider because lots of different factors can influence how much the plant uses and therefore the time needed between watering's.

If the plant has fleshy thick leaves it's been naturally adapted to receiving less water, cacti and succulents for example. Too frequent watering here and you will be increasing the chances of rotting. On the other hand if the plant's leaves are thin or numerous then it will have less tolerance for under watering and will need more frequent watering.

There is less light in Winter and the temperature is cooler. This means the plant slows down because photosynthesis is less effective. Providing the room isn't excessively hot you may be able to reduce watering to just once or twice a month over the Winter months. As the temperature and light intensity goes up so does the need for water. An increase in both of these variables results in a more effective level of photosynthesis which in turn needs more water.

Plants which are in very humid locations will need less water than those in dry environments. As a general rule a large plant in small pot will need much more water than a small plant in a big pot. This is because if the roots are filling the pot, there is less capacity for the soil to hold water because the roots are taking up the space.

The opposite is true when the plant is small but in a large pot, in these circumstances much more water can be held by the soil so less frequent watering is needed.. Plant's in clay pots compared to those in plastic ones, will normally need more water because the clay is porous and water is wicked away from the soil in the pot. Finally If you apply a mulch around the plant water will remain in the pot for a longer period as the mulch prevents the soil surface drying out as quickly.

Sometimes it's easy to know when to get the watering can out as a number of houseplants are rather clever and tell you when they want water. The Peace Lily in the photo below for example is very obvious. The picture on the right is the Peace Lily telling you it really needs water, the one on the left shows its now got plenty.

Most however don't give such clear signs, but there are a few subtle hints you might be able to pick up on. Under-watering and over-watering cause very similar warning signs in house plants. If you have read the two lists above you might be forgiven for thinking we have made a mistake and copied the same signs into each.

Unfortunately it's no mistake, frequent under watering and over watering cause very similar warning signs in house plants! Even the Peace Lily example above sometimes isn't always that clear. If the Peace Lily has had too much water it also flump's over a little bit, which the novice may assumes means more water is needed, and before long he or she is trapped in a cycle of continuously over watering. What ever time suits you! Well this is mostly true, a lot of house plants don't mind if you water them in the morning, afternoon or evening.

However as a general rule its best to avoid watering any plant in the evening when it involves wetting their crowns or exposed stems. The idea is that if you do this, the water sits on the plant and when the temperature drops at night it can encourage plant rot or diseases. There are three main ways to water. Sometimes it's about what is most convenient for you, other times it's simply about preference.

However it's almost always best to water heavily once, then wait until the soil starts to dry out rather than little and often.

This just involves watering from the top and allowing the water to filter through the pot by gravity. Although it's very quick it's less accurate than the other two methods below and so it's always best to have the pot sitting in a container or drip tray to catch any water that comes out of the drainage holes.

If your container has no drainage holes for excess water to escape from then you have no choice but to use this method, but be very careful you don't over do it! The plant pot is sitting in a drip tray and you just fill the tray up.

Eventually the water will be drawn up into the dry root ball. If the drip tray is quite small you may need to do this a few times until no more water is drawn up. Be sure to tip any excess water that is still in the tray away after half an hour to prevent rotting.

You need to fill a lager container such as a washing up bowl, and then lower your plant pot into the water just so the water level reaches the top of the pot.

Bubbles will appear on the surface, and when they stop after a minute or so the root ball will be fully saturated with water and you can remove the pot from the water. This method carries a risk of spreading diseases or pests if you are doing multiple plants in the same water. Make sure your plants are healthy, or ensure the sick one goes in last. The best water you can use on your house plants is the most natural - Rainwater or bottled water.

However both of these options can be impractical or expensive in the long term, so tap water is the most commonly used type of water. In the majority of situations tap water does not cause any problems, however if you live in a soft water area you need to carry out an additional occasional step to avoid issues.

This is because soft water contains salt that will build up in the soil which will eventually effect the natural transfer of minerals and water into the roots. To avoid this happening "flush" the pot once every couple of months. This just involves pouring in water to wash the salt build up out of the drainage holes. Be sure to provide fertiliser as you will also wash out nutrients in addition to the salt by doing this. Watering is normally a quick and painless process, but sometimes there is something wrong with the soil which causes issues:.

This is caused by a very dry surface soil. You don't typically get this unless your potting mix contains high levels of clay, for example if you have used garden soil instead of potting compost. Or the soil is completely bone dry. The solution is straight forward however, just prick the surface with a fork or small trowel to break it up a little, then try watering again.

This is almost always caused because the soil has dried out completely. This results in soil pulling away from the edges of the container creating a clear channel for the water to drain through, and the soil therefore does not have a chance to grab any of the water that is quickly passing by.

The solution is to follow the Immersion watering method above, if that isn't practical you can try Bottom watering.

Over the last 20 years, Tom has successfully owned hundreds of houseplants and is always happy to share knowledge and lend his horticulture skills to those in need. He is the main content writer for the Ourhouseplants Team. Credit for the houseplants and watering can - Kaufmann Mercantile Credit for the houseplant group photo to - Robin Berthier. With care guides and information about all popular indoor plants, we're here to help get your houseplants thriving.

From the beginner to the more experienced, there's something for everyone. As a Team, we've almost 50 years of hands-on experience and a variety of horticulture skills.

So let us help you to grow your knowledge and become a houseplant expert. Home Plants Guides About Shop. How often should I water my houseplants?

So let's dive in to this guide. Join Our Mailing List. How much to water depends on The plant itself If the plant has fleshy thick leaves it's been naturally adapted to receiving less water, cacti and succulents for example.

The time of year There is less light in Winter and the temperature is cooler. The environment As the temperature and light intensity goes up so does the need for water. The surrounding humidity Plants which are in very humid locations will need less water than those in dry environments.

The size of the plant pot and the material it's made of As a general rule a large plant in small pot will need much more water than a small plant in a big pot. Signs from the plant to look out for Sometimes it's easy to know when to get the watering can out as a number of houseplants are rather clever and tell you when they want water.

Leaves become limp and wilted. Sometimes faded or translucent. Flowers fade quickly or fail to actually bloom. The oldest leaves on the house plant start to fall off.


How to Keep Your Plants Watered While You’re on Holiday

All houseplants need water, to varying degrees of course. Take some of the guesswork out of caring for houseplants by choosing durable types and following an expert's advice. You can find foolproof plant recommendations and smart care tips in Tovah Martin's The Indestructible Houseplant. Even accomplished outdoor gardeners can stumble trying to make plants thrive inside. The New Plant Parent by Darryl Cheng is perfect for growers who like to understand the "why" behind advice. An engineer and analyst by trade, Cheng shows readers how to observe their spaces and their plants and base their decisions on plant purchases and care routines off of those observations. Smart Gardening.

Learn to recognize when houseplants need water. · Be aware of temperature, humidity, and ventilation. · Ensure that your houseplants get the right.

The Sneaky Way to Water Your Houseplants (and Why They Love the Shower)

Australian House and Garden. If you want plant life around you but don't have an outdoor space, introduce greenery into your interior with hardy indoor plants. But be careful to choose plants that can tolerate life on the inside. When buying an indoor plant , pay attention to the light requirements on the plant's tag. A main reason indoor plants don't thrive as well as they should is because they're not provided with the right type of light. Indoor plants can fall into four basic light requirements — direct sun, bright indirect light, light shade and full shade. If your plant isn't getting enough light, its lower leaves can turn yellow and fall off, have slow or no growth, variegated leaves can turn solid green, or new shoots reach out toward the light. If your plant is getting too much light, brown scorch marks can appear on leaves, your plant may wilt during hot part of the day, or leaves can become dry and fall off. Heat generated from fridges and heaters can make indoor plants too warm, so keep them positioned away from the heat source. As long as your home, generally, stays within the temperature range above, your indoor plants should have no dramas with temperature.

Indoor Plant Care: How to Water Your Houseplants Properly

Consumer helplineEven though watering seems like a simple task, this is where a lot of people can go wrong when caring for houseplants, by either over-watering or leaving them to become dehydrated. They normally need watering once or twice a week in the spring and summer, but less in the autumn and winter. However, depending on the type of houseplant, this is not always the case.

Regardless of the type of plants that you have in your home, watering house plants the correct way will determine the plant's overall health and life span.

How to Water Your Indoor Plants The Right Way

Watering houseplants sounds easy, but getting it right is a huge struggle for many indoor gardeners. How do you water houseplants? Sounds like such a simple question, right? But guess what… improper watering is the number one killer of indoor plants! The key to successfully growing houseplants is proper watering. It sounds easy, until you start to think of all the different types of indoor plants there are, each one potentially having different watering requirements.

Houseplant Primer: A Guide to Basic Care and Durable Plants

Indoor plants help to give our homes a touch of colour and life. But they're much more than that: they allow us to bring the different rooms in our house closer to nature; they add a sense of tranquillity, peace and harmony that we could not achieve with any other element. But for all this to become a reality, we must take care of them with dedication, even when we have no idea what we're doing. That's why we're here to give you tips on how to care for indoor plants to keep them as fresh and vibrant as the very first day you got them. To figure out which plants will suit your space , consider the sunlight available in your home. The labels on our plants indicate whether they need shade, indirect light or direct sunlight. They also mention whether they are outdoor or indoor plants and the appropriate temperatures. On our website, you'll find this information in the "materials and maintenance" section.

How, when, and where you water your garden and houseplants can critically a watering schedule, your plants will get the water they need.

How to Water Houseplants (and How to Know if You're Overwatering)

Danny Nett. Look, we've all been there. You fall in love with a plant at the store. You bring it home.

All house plants need water to keep them alive, but how much depends on their country of origin and the environment they evolved in. For example, a plant native to the jungles of South America will need more water than a cactus from the Mexican desert. Knowing how much water to give your plants is key to their survival. It pays to know the signs of under- or over-watered plants. If your plant is looking sickly, first check the compost. Leave it until the compost is soaked through and the plant shows signs of perking up.

Home » Lifestyle » Decor » How to grow indoor plants in water. If you wish to nurture some greenery at home, without devoting much time, the easiest option is to grow plants in the water.

Weed 'n' Feed. Share your gardening joy! Quite the contradiction, but we can help you fix that — without having to resort to faux foliage ugh! Visit your local nursery for a range of indoor plants. As a general rule of thumb, position plants in a well-lit spot, out of direct sunlight, like behind a window with a sheer curtain. Constant direct light, especially from the hot afternoon sun will cause your plants to wilt and suffer. In saying that, each plant will have different light requirement, with a few being able to tolerate low-light rooms, so check the plant label for specifications.

Avoid both extremes. Plants should not be watered on a schedule, but rather should be watered when they need it. Factors that influence plant watering include differences in potting media, humidity, and temperature. A large percentage of houseplants are lost because of overwatering and underwatering.


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