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Moving Rose Of Sharons – How To Transplant Rose Of Sharon Shrubs

Moving Rose Of Sharons – How To Transplant Rose Of Sharon Shrubs


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By: Teo Spengler

Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) is a large, hardy shrub that produces bright showy blossoms that are white, red, pink, violet and blue. The bush blossoms in summer, when only a few other shrubs flower. With a stiff, upright habit and open branches, Rose of Sharon works in both informal and formal garden arrangements. Transplanting a Rose of Sharon shrub is not difficult. Read on for tips on how and when to transplant a Rose of Sharon.

Moving Rose of Sharons

You may decide that moving Rose of Sharons is the best idea if you find that they are planted in shade or in an inconvenient location. Rose of Sharon transplanting is most successful if you undertake the task at the optimal time.

When do you transplant a Rose of Sharon? Not in the summer or winter. Your plants will be stressed if you try to transplant them when the weather is too hot or cold. Moving Rose of Sharon bushes at these times can kill them.

If you want to know when to transplant a Rose of Sharon, the best time to do it is while the shrubs are dormant. This is generally November through March. It stresses a plant to move it during the growing season and it will take longer to establish in the new location.

It is best to plan on transplanting a Rose of Sharon shrub in autumn. Moving the shrubs in the fall gives them all winter and spring to establish a strong root system before their flowering period. It is also possible to transplant in spring.

How to Transplant Rose of Sharon

When you are transplanting a Rose of Sharon, preparation of the new site is important. Remove all of the grass and weeds from the new planting location, and amend the soil with organic compost. You can do this toward summer’s end.

When you are done preparing the soil, dig a planting hole. Make it twice as big as you expect the shrub’s root ball to be.

In November, it is Rose of Sharon transplanting time. If the plant is very big, trim it back to make transplanting a Rose of Sharon easier. You can also tie up the lower branches if you are afraid you will injure them.

Gently dig around the plant’s roots and try to keep as many of them as you can in the root ball. Lift out the root ball carefully.

Place the plant in its new planting hole so that it is sitting at the same depth as it was in the prior planting location. Pat extracted earth around the sides of the root ball, then water well.

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Read more about Rose Of Sharon


Can I transplant young Rose of Sharon plants in July in Zone 6a?

I live in Massachusetts, growing zone 6a. Yesterday my husband was given some young Rose of Sharon plants from a friend at work, grown from seed by someone else. I've always wanted some, and would like to know how best to ensure successful growth. There are six seedlings, ranging in height from 7" to 12", in a 9" by 9" plastic pot filled with dense wet soil, which looks to me like garden dirt.

Can I transplant them now? I've been told this is the worst time of year to do that. Our temperatures are between eighty and ninety degrees F during the day, sometimes hotter, down to the sixties at night, and it's quite humid.

How should I care for them while they're in the pot? As you can see, the stems are bending. Is staking a good idea, or would that disturb the roots? Should the pot be in the sun or shade, and what's the proper amount of water? If it's too soon for planting in the ground, do they need separate containers, or are they okay together?

Finally, how much distance will they need between them, or other plants, in their permanent spot? I have a section of day lilies, some of which I'm planning to remove to make a home for the Rose of Sharon.

Edit to provide requested information: The variety is Hibiscus syriacus. The parent plant is full and bushy, with single purple flowers. It's six years old and just over six feet tall.


How to Dig Out and Remove Rose of Sharon Roots

The rose of Sharon is a hardy plant that reproduces itself year after year with new shoots coming up from the ground right next to the established plant. If left unchecked, the plant can quickly get out of control in your garden or yard. If you don’t want to prune the plant regularly, the rose of Sharon must be removed or transplanted somewhere else. To dig out and remove the rose of Sharon and its roots, you’ll want to start early in the morning and be prepared to work for a few hours.

Dig up the rose of Sharon if you want to transplant it to a new location so the plant is fully dormant. If you plan on disposing of the plant entirely, dig it up at any time of year. Cut off all of the limbs of the plant with a hand saw only if you are going to discard it, but leave as much of the plant intact as you can for transplanting.

  • The rose of Sharon is a hardy plant that reproduces itself year after year with new shoots coming up from the ground right next to the established plant.
  • If you don’t want to prune the plant regularly, the rose of Sharon must be removed or transplanted somewhere else.

Dig a circle around your rose of Sharon with a shovel, starting a foot out from the base and geting as far down in the soil as possible up to 1 1/2 feet deep. Use a pickax if necessary to break up the soil, but try to avoid severing large roots so you can pull the entire plant up.

Work inward toward the base of the plant to loosen and remove the soil around the root ball. Rock the rose of Sharon from the base occasionally to check for looseness and continue to work your way under the plant in the hole.

Lift the rose of Sharon from the hole once it is fully loosened. You may need a friend to help you lift the plant if it is large, especially if you are transplanting it, so it doesn’t get damaged. Either set the intact plant off to the side for transplanting or discard the unwanted plant.

  • Dig a circle around your rose of Sharon with a shovel, starting a foot out from the base and geting as far down in the soil as possible up to 1 1/2 feet deep.
  • Use a pickax if necessary to break up the soil, but try to avoid severing large roots so you can pull the entire plant up.

Pull out any remaining roots and use the pickax when needed to free them. Discard the roots and fill in the hole with garden soil or topsoil.

Depending on the area you have pulled your rose of Sharon from, replant the area with plants better suited to your landscaping, or spread out grass seed and let the hole grow over.

Be on the lookout for new rose of Sharon shoots the following spring in case any seeds fell in the fall. Dig up the shoots immediately to prevent new plants from growing.


Choosing the Best Rose of Sharon Varieties

Depending on when summer temperatures arrive in your region, Rose of Sharon shrubs may start blooming in early summer and continue well into fall. Their 2- to 3-inch flowers are smaller than tropical hibiscus, but more numerous. They come in frilly doubles and old-fashioned, single hollyhock-like blooms that hummingbirds love.

Selecting the best Rose of Sharon for your landscape starts with understanding the shrub's mature size. Many Rose of Sharon varieties grow 10 to 12 feet tall and nearly as wide, but some new dwarf varieties stay just 3 to 4 feet tall. These popular Rose of Sharon varieties illustrate the wide array of options:

  • Azurri Blue Satin – Nearly seedless, this variety grows 12 feet tall and 6 feet wide with red-throated, true-blue blooms.
  • Lil' Kim – Perfect for smaller landscapes, this dwarf variety stays 3 to 4 feet tall. Its striking white blooms have splashy burgundy throats.
  • Sugar Tip – This seedless semi-dwarf grows 5 to 6 feet tall, with cream-edged blue-green leaves and light pink double flowers.
  • Magenta Chiffon – Nearly seedless, this showy variety grows 12 feet tall and 10 feet wide, with deep magenta blooms reminiscent of English roses.
  • Purple Pillar – Excellent for hedges and tight spaces, this narrow form grows 2 to 3 feet wide and up to 16 feet tall, with red-throated, purple-pink blooms.

For best results, choose a variety that will suit your available space when the shrub is fully mature. Your shrub will do well and need less maintenance, too.

Rose of Sharon flowers come in single and double forms.


Question 3: Invasive weed?

Tara: My 87-year-old dad wanted me to ask you if you could tell what type of invasive weed this is and how to remove it?

Doug: You’ve got an interesting question from dad as that’s common milkweed. About 20 years ago we’d call it a weed, now people are trying to grow it as the species is the only host plant for the monarch butterfly. As your dad can testify, once the common variety takes hold, it’s hard to get rid of.

If he can’t stand the plant, the best way to eradicate it is continual top cutting. I know that won’t be easy for someone who is 87, but maybe someone can help. If you cut it to the ground every week, the roots won’t get what they need. We like to joke that you’ll either exhaust the plant or it will exhaust you! If he’s up for keeping it, the variety is a great pollinator plant, not only for monarchs, but other species too.


Rose of Sharon transplant

Canesisters

Garden Master

Flowerbug

Garden Master

i don't really know these plants. do they still have leaves on them at all?

anyways, even with that lack of knowledge i'd say move them whenever you can if the ground isn't frozen. you may lose some of them, but it sounds like they'll make more for another try some other time. earlier is better, but i don't think you have particularly harsh winters down there. if it looks like it is getting too dry give 'em a squirt of water.

oh, and with many transplants it is good to balance the top of the plant with the bottom (i.e. if you get a plant up and there's only a bit of root you probably need to trim it back - though i think having more roots than top is ok so perhaps balance isn't the right word there. ).

Ridgerunner

Garden Master

Cane, often perfect can be the enemy of good enough. Yes the perfect time to transplant certain trees and bushes is when they are dormant, like those Rose of Sharon should be now. As long as they have not broken dormancy I'd think is still a really good time. If your ground were frozen fall might have been better but in Virginia it is not frozen.

One of my concerns if it is that wet is can you pack the soil around the roots without leaving voids. Voids can cause the roots to dry out.

Rose of Sharon grow a tap root. That's not something I knew, I looked that up. The older they are the deeper it will be and the harder to transplant. Since you have different sizes of small ones, I'd suggest you try to use a shovel to move the plant with an intact dirt ball. That way there should be no voids and you'll probably be forced to move a small one because of the weight of the dirt so maybe no long tap root. It might not even know it was transplanted. Those things tend to grow fairly fast.

As many offspring as you re seeing, will it be considered invasive where you are putting it?


Transplanting Rose of Sharon-- Pruning Question

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006

I am planning to transplant my Rose of Sharons and Rosa Banksia. should I prune them? If so, how much? Any secrets to help with transplant survival?
Thanks a million!
Katherine

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Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do. but how much love we put in that action. -Mother Teresa

Work for the Lord - the pay isn't much but the retirement is out of this world!

"Until one has loved an animal a part of one's sould remains unawakened."

Sorry still waking up..
Basic rule of thumb move when dormant when no new growth is on the shrub. if you choose to move it now bypass the pruning till fall so you do't risk re-shocking..
and you shouldn't remove more than 1/3 of the plant..

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We are moving from LA to MS and the move has been delayed, so now I am facing transplanting into the growing season here (next week.)

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Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do. but how much love we put in that action. -Mother Teresa

Work for the Lord - the pay isn't much but the retirement is out of this world!

"Until one has loved an animal a part of one's sould remains unawakened."

Just go ahead and plant it . but wait to do the pruning! you should be ok that way!!

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Tonight I am having friends for dinner. Hanibal Lector My Album


Watch the video: How to grow and care Rose of sharon Hibiscus syriacus