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Silver Pig's Ears

Silver Pig's Ears


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Succulentopedia

Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig's Ear)

Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig's Ear) is a succulent shrub with erect to decumbent stems and leaves hugely variable in color, shape, and…


Cotyledon Species, Pig's Ear, Round-Leafed Navel Wort

Family: Crassulaceae (krass-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cotyledon (kot-EE-lee-don) (Info)
Species: orbiculata (or-bee-kul-AY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Cotyledon orbiculata var. hinrichseniana
Synonym:Cotyledon orbiculata subsp. orbiculata
Synonym:Cotyledon orbiculata var. oophylla
Synonym:Cotyledon ungulata
Synonym:Adromischus mucronatus

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Vista, California(9 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Oct 22, 2009, crazymary from Lodi, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

It is hard in my zone to find succulents other than echeveria or sedum to survive the winters. However, this plant has survived frost, uncovered in a pot for two years without damage. I put in in the ground this year. We will see. The orange and yellow flowers seem to last quite a while as well. Love it.

On Jul 24, 2008, Joan from Belfield, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

Additional synonyms: Cotyledon orbiculata var. rotundifolia, Cotyledon elata, Cotyledon orbiculata var. engleri, Cotyledon undulata var. mucronata, Cotyledon decussata, Cotyledon flanaganii var. karroensis, Cotyledon orbiculata var. viridis, Cotyledon decussata var. dielsii, Cotyledon orbiculata var. dinteri, Cotyledon orbiculata var. elata, Cotyledon orbiculata, Cotyledon ovata, Cotyledon ramosissima, Cotyledon orbiculata var. ramosa, Cotyledon ramosa, Cotyledon orbiculata var. higginsiae, Cotyledon orbiculata var. ausana, Cotyledon papillaris var. tricuspidata, Cotyledon ausana, Cotyledon decussata var. hinrichseniana, Cotyledon papillaris, Cotyledon engleri, Cotyledon orbiculata var. obovata, Cotyledon mucronata, Cotyledon tricuspidata

On Sep 16, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Highly variable species. have seen some with small green leaves, large silver leaves, ovoid, long, round, flat. etc. Not sure if all should be divided into subspecies, but it is clear all plants identified as this species are not all the same. The Cotyledon 'macrantha form' is a deep green, as opposed to all the others which are a pale blue or powdery silver blue-green.

On Aug 23, 2003, Happenstance from Northern California, CA wrote:

Here in Northern California I have the "blue" form growing in several pots by design and other places just by accident. It really will take over if given the room, so I do not grow it in the ground on purpose.

The forms vary a great deal, and not all the plants from the original look exactly alike. Amount of sun, amount of fertilizer, amount of care(less is better) all slightly alter the look of the plant. The flowers in a pot in the greenhouse are definitely "pinkish" as compared to the red/orange/yellow out in the hot sun. The amount of "powder" on the leaves is reduced because I water with a heavy handed hose, but winter in the greenhouse sees the powder return.


Cotyledon, Wavy Leaved Pig's Ear 'Silver Waves'

Family: Crassulaceae (krass-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cotyledon (kot-EE-lee-don) (Info)
Species: orbiculata (or-bee-kul-AY-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Silver Waves
Additional cultivar information:(aka Wavelata)

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed


Transcript

SOPHIE THOMSON: Dry shade can be one of the most challenging conditions for gardeners with the joy of a well established tree equalled by the frustration of trying to grow plants underneath them. Succulents however are a great plant to choose because even though they're thought of as sun lovers, they also grow well in the shade.

This position will be perfect for succulents. And once established, they won't need to be watered. Generally succulents with grey or green foliage are better for low-light areas and avoid the ones with dark or burgundy leaves.

Here are three of my favourites. This one here is Echeveria x imbricate. It forms lovely large rosettes of grey/green foliage to about 30 centimetres across with beautiful pendant sprays of apricot pink flowers. Just lovely.

This one is Cotyledon orbiculata, sometimes known as Pig Ears. You can see it has fabulous silver foliage and looks lovely under plants with white or silver trunks. In the sun it will grow to 50cms high, but in the shade it reaches up a little bit more.

And this one here is Aloe maculate. It's got spines on the edge of the leaf but it has beautiful bright orange flowers and forms relatively low mounds of foliage.

I took these cuttings about a weeks ago and left them in a dry, shady spot to heal. Now, I'm simply going to dig holes about 10 centimetres deep and backfill with some compost to plant these cuttings. I've put the Echeverias along the path because they form a wonderful border plant and I'll put the ones that are slightly spiky into the bed a little bit where they can't catch anyone.

Now if you've got really bad root competition and you can't dig, one little trick is simply to get your cutting and peg it down - this is just a piece of old coat hanger wire - and what that does is if we peg it down and then cover it with soil, it still allows the cutting to root and develop properly.

In a couple of months, these cuttings will have all developed roots to create a dynamic under-planting in an area of dry shade and this bed will require a little, if any, maintenance throughout the seasons.

STEPHEN RYAN: Now it's off to Brisbane where Jerry jumps the backfence to see how his neighbours have created a beautiful and productive garden despite their opposing theories on gardening.


Watch the video: Building a custom stainless water tank vent Project Brupeg Ep. 204


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