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Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla'

Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla'


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Succulentopedia

Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla'

Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla' is an odd plant with a strongly structured surface. It is a popular Japanese cultivar, and there are…


Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla' - garden

Origin and Habitat: Japan (Nursery produced cultivar)

Description: The "Green Coral" also known as Super Godzilla (Supergodzilla) is an amazing cultivar with very rough, round & short leaves probably developed by Japanese growers from the famous Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Godzilla. The "Green Coral" must be considered the next step of "Godzilla" with larger and longer green warts on the tubercles surface and there are several slightly different types or clones in circulation. The strongly structured surface and the deep colour of the plants are typical, but greener or more warty plants are in the variation range of this cultivar.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Ariocarpus fissuratus group

Notes: Sought by collectors seedling can up to 50 years to reach full growth of 15 cm in diameter. For this reason the plants are frequently grafted to speed up the growth.


Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Green Coral Photo by: Prof. Ilham Alakbarov
Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Green Coral Photo by: Flavio Agrosi
a.k.a. "Supergodzilla" Photo by: Flavio Agrosi
Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Green Coral Photo by: Prof. Ilham Alakbarov

Cultivation and Propagation: It is not too difficult in a greenhouse, although grows extremely slowly. The plants need deep pots to accommodate the napiform unit formed by the stem base and the rootstock (or they will often simply crack your pots), , and a loose mineral soil with a well-drained substrate. They need a good amount of light. Watering can be done weekly during summertime, if the weather is sunny enough, with a little fertilizer added. Kept this way, plants will show a healthy, although slow growth.
Propagation: By seeds, remembering that seedlings dislike strong light and dry conditions and need to be repotted frequently. Eventually, as they become mature, they attain a maximum size of 20 to 25 cm. But plants are often grafted to accelerate growth as they would generally take at least a decade to reach maturity on their own, but the grafted plants are typical rather tall growing, compared with plants on their own roots that are usually more flat to the ground. It starts blooming at the age of 8-12 years.


Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla' - garden

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Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced hybrid).

Description: This is a slow growing cactus obtained by crossing ♀ Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower x ♂ Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Godzilla. The superb features of this rare plant are due to the intersection between the traits of the ancestors. It has inherited by Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower the huge warty triangular grey-green tubercles and by Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Godzilla the strongly structured surface. This hybrid is very variable and differences among specimens may be considerable.


Ariocarpus fissuratus cv. Cauliflower x Godzilla Photo by: Raimondo Paladini

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The gallery now contains thousands of pictures, however it is possible to do even more. We are, of course, seeking photos of species not yet shown in the gallery but not only that, we are also looking for better pictures than those already present. Read More.

Cultivation and Propagation: It is not too difficult in a greenhouse, although grows extremely slowly. The plants need deep pots to accommodate the napiform unit formed by the stem base and the rootstock (or they will often simply crack your pots), and a loose mineral soil with a well-drained substrate. They need a good amount of light. Watering can be done weekly during summertime, if the weather is sunny enough, with a little fertilizer added. Kept this way, plants will show a healthy, although slow growth.
Propagation: By seeds, remembering that seedlings dislike strong light and dry conditions and need to be repotted frequently. Eventually, as they become mature, they attain a maximum size of 20 to 25 cm. But plants are often grafted to accelerate growth as they would generally take at least a decade to reach maturity on their own, but the grafted plants are typical rather tall growing, compared with plants on their own roots that are usually more flat to the ground. It starts blooming at the age of 8-12 years.


Contents

This cactus consists of many small tubercles growing from a large tap root. They are usually solitary, rarely giving rise to side shoots from old areoles. The plant is greyish-green in color, sometimes taking on a yellowish tint with age. Its growth rate is extremely slow. A. fissuratus is naturally camouflaged in its habitat, making it difficult to spot. [3] When they are found, it is usually due to their pinkish flowers which bloom in October and early November. [3]

In cultivation, Ariocarpus fissuratus is often grafted to a faster-growing columnar cactus to speed growth, as they would generally take at least a decade to reach maturity on their own. They require very little water and fertilizer, a good amount of light, and a loose sandy soil with good drainage.

Tens of thousands of this protected Texas cacti are annually removed Illegally. [4] Poaching has even extended to Big Bend National Park. Smugglers have taken entire populations of A. fissuratus, primarily for collectors, mainly in Europe and Asia. Loss of such a wide range of genetic variation weakens the species chances of future survival. [5] According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the cactus is protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). [6]

Ariocarpus fissuratus is a unique species in that it has been used by Native American tribes as a mind-altering substance, usually only as a substitute for peyote. [7] While it does not contain mescaline like species such as peyote, it has been found to contain other centrally active substances, such as N-methyltyramine and hordenine, [7] albeit in doses too small to be active.

  1. ^ Fitz Maurice, B. Sotomayor, M. Terry, M. Heil, K. Fitz Maurice, W.A. Hernández, H.M. & Corral-Díaz, R. (2017). "Ariocarpus fissuratus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 208. e.T152093A121435805. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T152093A121435805.en.
  2. ^ abc
  3. "Ariocarpus fissuratus". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) . Retrieved 2010-10-02 .
  4. ^ abc
  5. Morey, Roy (2008). Little Big Bend : Common, Uncommon, and Rare Plants of Big Bend National Park. Lubbock: Texas Tech University Press. p. 43. ISBN9780896726130 . OCLC80359503.
  6. ^ Walker, R, “Texas’s cactus cops battle to save rare desert beauty from smuggling gangs” [1], The Guardian , 20 June 2020. Retrieved 21 June 2020.
  7. ^ Barrus, A. “Special Agents and Partners Strike Major Blow to Cactus Black Market” [2], U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service , 2019. Retrieved 21 June 2020.
  8. ^ U.S. Attorney’s Office [" El Paso Man Pleads Guilty to Role in Scheme to Sell Protected Cacti" https://www.justice.gov/usao-wdtx/pr/el-paso-man-pleads-guilty-role-scheme-sell-protected-cacti], ' Department of Justice , June 2020. Retrieved 21 June 2020.
  9. ^ ab Ratsch, C: "The Sun", page 67. Park Street Press, 2005

Ratsch, C. (2005). The Encyclopedia of Psychoactive Plants: Ethnopharmocology and its Applications, Vermont: Park Street Press. ISBN0-89281-978-2


Ariocarpus fissuratus 'Godzilla' - garden

Origin and Habitat: Ariocarpus fissuratus is distributed in the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, and Zacatecas, and in the United States in Texas (Hernández et al. 2004). It occurs from Presidio County, Texas southeast along the Rio Grande and near the lower Pecos River. In Mexico, it occurs near the Rio Grande in the adjacent states of Chihuahua and Coahuila.
Altitude range: This cactus grows at altitudes between 500 and 1,170 (1500?) metres above sea level.
Habitat and Ecology: These plants are characteristic of dry limestone plains (and areas of gentle slopes), ridges and low, rocky hills of limestone chips among the Chihuahuan desert scrub (xerophyllous scrub), rarely occurring in gypseous soils. The stems are normally flush and well camouflaged with the soil surface resembling limestone chips in shape, colour, and texture, rendering the plants extremely cryptic. They are greyish-green in colour, sometimes taking on a yellowish tint with age. These cacti are difficult to spot in their natural habitat. When they are found, it is usually due to their pinkish flowers. In times of severe drought, the whole above-ground portion of these plants can shrink and be covered by rock fragments, but the taproot remains alive. Many exist as only small, isolated populations, and they were in danger of extinction because they were sought by plant collectors, up to date there is some illegal collection of the species from the wild but at a diminishing rate. For this reason they are protected plants in the regions where they occur. This species is still locally abundant in its appropriate habitat.

  • Ariocarpus fissuratus K.Schum. in Engl. & Prantl
    • Anhalonium Engelmannii Lem.
    • Anhalonium fissuratum (Engelm.) Engelm.
    • Mammillaria fissurata Engelm.
    • Roseocactus fissurams A.Berger
    • Roseocactus fissuratus (Engelm.) A.Berger

Description: Ariocarpus fissuratus is a geophyte plant that produces a star-shaped rosette of fleshy, deltoid to hemispheric tubercles, which have no spines and lie almost flat on the soil surface. They are usually solitary, rarely giving rise to side shoots from old areoles, they grow extremely slowly, to 20 cm in diameter. This species is considered a separate entity from Ariocarpus bravoanus (including Ariocarpus bravoanus subsp. hintonii) following Hunt et al. (2006).
Tubercles: The tubercles, about as long as wide, are closely packed and form a coarse mosaic. Exposed faces of tubercles, deeply fissured on either side of the central areolar groove, are coarsely rugose, and are often sharply angled apically and with a lateral longitudinal furrow on each side of the tubercle, along the edge.
Areoles: The areoles are up to 3 mm wide, sometimes confined to middle of tubercle faces instead of extending to tips.
Roots: Each plant has a large turnip-like taproot, which lies below the soil surface and serves for water storage.
Flowers: These plants have a woolly crown, from which emerge bright pink-violet flowers up to 2,5-5 cm, 2 times wider than long when fully expanded. Flowers last for 3 to 4 days.
Blooming season: October, November.
Fruits: white or green, with lots of seed.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Ariocarpus fissuratus group

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Edward Anderson “The Cactus family” Timber Press, Incorporated, 2001
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey "The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass" Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug/2011
3) David R Hunt Nigel P Taylor Graham Charles International Cactaceae Systematics Group. "The New Cactus Lexicon" dh books, 2006.
4) Fitz Maurice, B, Sotomayor, M., Terry, M., Heil, K., Fitz Maurice, W.A., Hernández, H.M. & Corral-Díaz, R. 2013. Ariocarpus fissuratus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2015.1. . Downloaded on 21 June 2015.


Cultivated specimen, about 25 years old. Photo by: Cactus Art
In times of severe drought, the whole above-ground portion of these plants can shrink and be covered by rock fragments. Photo by: Agócs György
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Cactus Art
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Cactus Art
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Cactus Art
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Ariocarpus fissuratus Photo by: Prof. Ilham Alakbarov

Cultivation and Propagation: Ariocarpus fissuratus is not too difficult in a greenhouse, although it grows extremely slowly (it starts blooming at the age of 8-12 years).
Soil: Use a loose mineral cactus mix with extra perlite or pumice and clay pots help the plants to dry out between watering.
Repotting: The plants need deep pots to accommodate the napiform unit formed by the stem base and the rootstock (or they will often simply crack your pots). Generally, they should be repotted frequently at least every other year in order to provide fresh soil. However, old plants become senile and have a tendency to succumb to disease and a weak root system. At this stage, as is well known, they die suddenly. So, after they reach 20 cm in diameter grow them slowly, and adopt a new repotting period, using intervals of every 3 years. Additionally grow them under drier conditions or with stronger sunlight. However, repotting doesn't necessarily mean they'll need larger containers.
Sun Exposure: Partial sun or light shade. They need a good amount of light, a place near the roof of the greenhouse helps drying the pot after watering.
Watering: They require moderately watering through the growing season. This can be done weekly during the summertime, if the weather is sunny enough, with a little fertilizer added. Kept this way, plants will show a healthy, although slow growth. Keep dry as soon as the temperature starts dropping in October and keep it perfectly dry in winter at temperatures from 5 to 15 degrees centigrade.
Hardiness: Winter care presents no problems at 5°C with plenty of light., but frost hardy to -10°C.
Pest and diseases: They are generally fairly easy to grow, especially if kept pest-free. They are susceptible to stem and root mealy bugs, and damage from these may well initiate fungal attack.
Propagation: By seeds, remembering that seedlings dislike strong light and dry conditions, but the grafted plants are typically rather tall- growing, compared with plants on their own roots, that are usually flatter to the ground.


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