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Golden Root

Golden Root


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Succulentopedia

Rhodiola rosea (Golden Root)

Rhodiola rosea (Golden Root) is a succulent plant up to 16 inches (40 cm) tall with several stems growing from a short, scaly rootstock…


Scutellaria Species, Baikal Skullcap, Chinese Scullcap, Golden Root, Helmet Flower

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Scutellaria (skew-teh-LARE-ee) (Info)
Species: baicalensis (by-kol-EN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Scutellaria adamsii
Synonym:Scutellaria davurica
Synonym:Scutellaria lanceolaria
Synonym:Scutellaria macrantha
Synonym:Scutellaria speciosa

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed sow indoors before last frost

From seed direct sow after last frost

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Great Cacapon, West Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

On Aug 23, 2009, plutodrive from Denver, CO (Zone 5b) wrote:

This plant is drought tolerant and suitable for xeriscaping.

On Jan 9, 2008, LeBug from Greenville, IN (Zone 6a) wrote:

I love my skullcap, I’ve had it in a part sun herb garden for at least four years now and it has grown to 3’ around only about a foot high, covered with dark purple orchid like flowers the hummers go from one to the other spending a lot of time making sure they hit every one of them! I’m trying some new ones this year, mine doesn’t require a lot of water very drought tolerant even with the drought we had last year (2007), I have the hard clay soil and it does very well.

On Dec 19, 2004, NatureWalker from New York & Terrell, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

A perennial herb from the mint family with many small blue-purple flowers on woody stems in the second year.
Start seeds indoors in late February or early March at 1/4 inch depth.
Soil temperature should be at 50-60 degrees.
Transplant into garden when seedlings are 4-6 inches tall, and all danger of frost has past.
Plant in full sun, in well drained soil.

Watering: During germination, keep the entire starter-bed evenly moist by misting/spraying.
Keep plant well-watered through maturity, allowing soil surface to dry between waterings.

The Chinese have used this valuable plant as a medicinal herb for over 2,000 years, it is very versatile.
Plants must be 3-4 years of age to be used medicinally.
Harvest mature ro. read more ots in the spring and dry in partial shade in a well ventiated place. The root matures in the 3rd year.


THE BASICS

Botanical name:

Plant Type:

Hardiness zone:

Varies, depending on the species. Most are durable enough to tolerate cold winters and hot summers.

Bloom time:

Goldenrods have a long bloom period, typically flourishing from late summer to mid-fall. Some cultivars, such as Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks', will continue to flower until the first frost.

Height:

From under a foot to more than 6 feet.

Solidago sphacelata ‘Golden Fleece’. Photo by: Claire Gainey / Alamy Stock Photo

Color and characteristics:

Although members of the aster family (Asteraceae), goldenrod flowers bear little resemblance. Instead of individual daisy-like flowers (ray flowers), goldenrods produce clusters of tiny yellow or gold florets, some in the form of broad and nearly flat-topped corymbs and others cascading in feathery panicles from arching stems. Some varieties, such as Solidago sphacelata ‘Golden Fleece’, also have attractive semi-evergreen foliage that extends the season of interest.

Other attributes:

  • Deer resistant.
  • Tolerates drought and poor soils.
  • Few disease or insect problems.
  • Great for cutting.

Ragweed vs goldenrod: Does goldenrod cause hay fever?:

Contrary to common belief, goldenrod pollen does not contribute to hay fever or allergy symptoms because it is too sticky to go airborne. The more likely offender is ragweed (Ambrosia), which blooms around the same time and looks similar.


How to Grow Goldenrod Plants

Growing and planting goldenrod is easy, as this plant will survive just about anywhere, though it does prefer to be grown in full sun. Goldenrod also tolerates various soil types as long as it’s well draining.

Goldenrod care is minimal once established in the landscape, with plants returning each year. They require little, if any watering, and are drought tolerant. Clumps need division every four to five years. Cuttings may also be taken in spring and planted in the garden.

Learning how to grow goldenrod offers many advantages. Bad bugs can be drawn to the plant and consumed by beneficial insects that hatch their young there. Planting goldenrod adds beauty and attracts butterflies to your landscape.


Sedum Species, Golden Root, Roseroot Stonecrop, Rosewort

Family: Crassulaceae (krass-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sedum (SEE-dum) (Info)
Species: roseum (RO-zee-um) (Info)
Synonym:Rhodiola arctica
Synonym:Rhodiola rosea

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

This plant is fire-retardant

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2a: to -45.5 °C (-50 °F)

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 °C (-45 °F)

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 °C (-35 °F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Sep 18, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

Western North American plants formerly included in R. rosea are now treated as Rhodiola integrifolia and Rhodiola rhodantha.

On Sep 18, 2016, Ted_B from Birmingham, AL (Zone 8a) wrote:

Viable seeds germinate reliably in cool temperatures after 120s cold stratification. Seedlings fare best in a sandy, fast draining succulent growth medium. Seedlings succeed well indoors and grow rapidly under lights, with only occasional watering. The easiest way to kill seedlings is to attempt to grow them in moisture retentive soil and/or overwater them.

On Jun 5, 2014, cgm707 from San Diego, CA wrote:

Does anyone know where this sedum can be purchased?

On May 5, 2004, ZaksGarden from Winston Salem, NC wrote:

My neighbor gave me one full grown plant, and two babies it had put off. I love having this plant in my garden! It has beautiful foliage and always catches the eyes of all the visitors of my garden.

Used by many cultures as an adaptagen or tonic. Vikings used this root to boost courage before battle. Recent research shows that Rhodiola rosea reduces anxiety and increases the effectiveness of some cancer chemotherapy drugs while lessening their side effects. Species name rosea originates from rose-like scent of the roots.

On Sep 30, 2002, Weezingreens from Seward, AK (Zone 3b) wrote:

Rose root is a fleshy plant with blue-green rosettes that are topped with small, brownish-red flowers beginning in June. Roseroot's name is derived from the rose-like smell that is present when the roots are cut.

This native sedum grows up to 6000 ft on the mountains surrounding our Southcentral Alaskan coastal town. It is found along rocky cliffs, throughout most of Alaska, but adapts well to the rock garden.

Roseroot is not easy to transplant when found in rocky areas where the roots grow deep into crevices. They will grow from seed if little or no soil cover is applied. Young plants are edible, eaten cooked or raw.


Watch the video: Goldenseal Root heals quickly and safely


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