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Information About Rangoon Creeper


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Quisqualis Indica Care – Information About Rangoon Creeper Vine

By Amy Grant

Amongst the lush foliage of the world's tropical forests one will find a predominance of lianas or vine species. One of these creepers is the Quisqualis rangoon creeper plant. Read this article to learn more.

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Combretum Species, Burma Creeper, Chinese Honeysuckle, Drunken Sailor, Rangoon Creeper

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Capistrano Beach, California

Rancho Santa Margarita, California

Bradenton, Florida(3 reports)

Green Cove Springs, Florida

Panama City Beach, Florida

Port Charlotte, Florida(2 reports)

Sarasota, Florida(2 reports)

Vero Beach, Florida(2 reports)

West Palm Beach, Florida(2 reports)

Greenwell Springs, Louisiana

New Iberia, Louisiana(2 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Sep 29, 2020, Ompus from Miami, FL wrote:

Here in Miami, this vine has abundant beautiful flowers with a delicious fragrance and rapid growth. With that said, NEVER Plant it.

I have been attempting to eradicate seedlings for several years now. They grow fast and often climb 20ft before they 'reveal' themselves. I've noticed it overtaking neighborhood hedges where it volunteered. I believe the double is sterile, but avoid the single at all cost.

On Jun 15, 2019, ocean_girl from Gotha, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I have rangoon creeper that was planted in 1996, it is absolutely beautiful and smells wonderful. I am in SW Orange County Fl zone 9B. It has only received rain water and never fertilized. It blooms for 9-10 months out of the year and is dormant the others. It does not die back in winter and it has survived several hurricanes. 2004 hurricane pulled it out of the ground but I came right back within a year. It is not invasive, it grows tall and wide but has not grown out of its planted area at all. I am currently trying to propagate it and plant it on the other side of my yard

On Jun 28, 2017, Cactusdude from Miami, FL (Zone 10b) wrote:

Frighteningly invasive in moist or irrigated situations in South Florida.
Develops into a woody liana with prickly stems. Seeds abundantly in warm wet weather. Will cover large areas and quickly climb, smother, and even break large trees. Seedlings develop very quickly.
Absolutely DO NOT GROW in warm-climate areas! Pretty flowers, but a horrible landscaping and environmental pest.

On Jun 9, 2017, Rests from Bryan, TX wrote:

I planted another rangoon creeper along the fence. It is really growing fast. The older rangoon creeper is not growing as fast. I am thinking that the new plant is in better soil. I am feeding the older vine more fertilizer for acid loving plants and watering the heck out of it. It is responding and growing better. I am finding that here in Texas that they need lots and lots of water. My rating for this is somewhere between positive and neutral. Wish it would bloom.


My experience could turn positive. Planted this about a year ago. The plant did nothing all last spring and summer. It froze back this winter. I watered and fertilized where it was planted hoping to see it come up. I saw nothing for wee. read more ks. We had a 4 inch rain this past week. Much to my surprise, I came back up and grew about 3 inches in 3 days. Hope this is a good sign.

My Rangood Creeper is finally beginning to grow. However, the new growth looks very anemic even with fertilization. Not the beautiful fast growing flowering vine I had hoped for. I have almost a negative rating for this plant. Not the invasive plant I hear people complain about.

Don't know what to think. I pull on the stem and it is firmly in the ground, but don't see that it is trying to sprout. Been told to give it another few weeks to sprout before digging up the plant. Like Blue Sky Vine, it needs more of a tropical area like Houston to thrive in. If you live in a tropical area, this is a plant for your area. If you live north of Houston in Texas, don't even try to grow this. Very finicky. Too bad. Can be quite beautiful.

Finally gave up on the two I have. Pulled them up and going to plant crossvine. One of the plants finally died, and the other hasn't grown more than 3 inches. This plant hates the heat and salt here.

On May 8, 2017, MarjieW from Okatie, SC wrote:

I'm concerned about introducing a non-native plant that can be invasive. Kudzu anyone?

On May 21, 2016, cleasands from Rockport, TX wrote:

I had 3 till a flood killed 1 and I killed one trying to move it.
The living one is very healthy. this plant is NOT INVASIVE in Texas, maybe it is in Florida. Here in Rockport TX it completely dies back in winter, comes back in spring.
Love the hypnotic scent and want to start more! It needs a little protection from hot afternoon sun but it gets sun all day.
I'm looking at it out my window and now it has some pink and some red blooms. amazing plant!

On Aug 27, 2015, illinibunny from Lake Geneva, WI wrote:

I bought a Rangoon creeper a year ago. The thing grew and grew in my greenhouse, and at the end of July, was loaded with buds. When the plant bloomed, I expected to be transported by the fragrance, but to me, it is redolent of body odor. It really stinks. I know that people perceive fragrances differently, but I buy plants primarily to enjoy their fragrance. To its credit, it grows well in a pot, and it's very pretty in full bloom, but I moved it outside so I could enjoy my brunfelsia Americana, jasmines and gardenias all the delicious fragrances it was tainting with its nastiness. Perhaps that's why some people call it drunken sailor. It smells like one.

On Jun 14, 2015, Tcatjo from New Braunfels, TX wrote:

Mine has been in the ground 3 years in zone 8b. It comes back every year but this is the first year for it to bloom. It doesn't get full sun but my moms does and hers blooms much better than mine. I'm thinking of getting another one and planting in full sun. I love the plant and see absolutely NO signs of it being invasive, it has stayed where it was planted for the past 3 years.

On May 26, 2015, Vanda30 from Bradenton, FL wrote:

I have a huge double Rangoon growing up my balcony, absolutely love walking out in the morning to its' fragrant blooms! Also, have single Rangoon Creeper growing on fence - it produces seeds, yet is several years younger than the Double Rangoon - are all doubles sterile & do not produce seed? Both plants were purchased as small seedlings from Tropical plant vendors, here in Bradenton, FL (Zone 9a/10b) Also, curious about seed germination to propogate seedlings. I've heard cutting the top of a fresh pod off and sowing it in pod is the way to go? Any suggestions/tips? Thanks!

On May 24, 2014, AColdStArnolds79 from Houston, TX wrote:

I first bought one of these in 2004 from Another Place in Time in the Heights of Houston. We moved to a new house two years ago and I've missed this plant. Found them yesterday at the Lowes on 529 and Hiway 6. Only 18.99 for a three feet tall plant. I've never seen them in this size for a price close to that.
I never experienced my plant being invasive. I did trim it a few times a year to control where it's tendrils went. The blooms are wonderful and the fragrance is strong. Mine was on the edge of my driveway and many people would ask me what it was.
At night in the summer sphinx moths would be all over it. Like hummingbirds in flight but a moth.
I'd recommend this to anyone in the south. Mine froze back many years. Like Hibiscus the more years it is in th. read more e ground and returns the more resistant it seems to get to freeze.
Mine did put on what appeared to be seed pods a couple of times but never produced actual seed.

On Apr 12, 2014, sylves13 from Parrish, FL wrote:

We have been able to star several of these plants using cuttings from the ends of the runners. We do use a root starter for the new shoots.

On Jan 3, 2013, neek from Kenilworth,
Australia wrote:

I have grown up with Quisqualis.My mum is 93 and her family had it growing. When I was a child It grew on a full width high trellis over the top of a double garage in front of my parents house. Every Christmas it is a tradition in the family to have it on the table. I have two plants now of my own grown from seeds. The scent is wonderful. I am wanting another one and wondered if it will grow from a cutting from the thicker wood closer to the base. I haven't noticed any seeds on these plants of my own which are 3-5 years old. Not sold in nurseries here.

On Nov 24, 2012, kenburk101 from Old Jefferson, LA wrote:

I planted four rangooon creeper earlier this year. They are doing beautifully. I'm just curious, though. The leaves on mine are turning red. It's a beautiful red and some of the leaves are two-toned red and green. The plants don't seem sick, but I cannot find any pictures on-line where these plants look like this. Has anyone else had this happen?

On Nov 5, 2012, MickeyAz from Cave Creek, AZ wrote:

I love this plant after seeing in in Galveston Tx. I got one and it wouldn't flower. I moved it to full sun and feed it, watched to keep it watered and vola. flowers. I still keep it in a pot so I can bring it inside for the winter and I am also able to move it around out side. I want to try and see if I can root some stem cuttings too.
I have both the single and the double. So far only the single has bloomed.

On Jul 27, 2012, love4plants from Dickinson, TX wrote:

I have 4 rangoon creepers. That may be a mistake after reading how invasive they are. Three of them are planted against a wooden fence with hog wire attached to it. One of the plants is finally blooming. It is very green and very thick. I was telling my husband your blog said it needs an acid fertilizer and he said "Oh, that may be why it is not blooming too much, I have been dumping the ashes from the fireplace in that bed" Now he tells me! Oh well, at least now I know.
I am going to feed it an acid fertilizer now and maybe I will be blessed by a mass of blooms :)

On Jul 25, 2012, fancytailsfish from Lake Placid, FL wrote:

i have found this plant here at my house !! its huge . I live on 25 acres passed down by my father and from his father and from his mother and so on and so on . im 6th generation ! anyway not sure when it was planted ? I live in lake placid Florida and was walking around looking to see whats new ! being from pa I have come across some really cool plants !! not really used to the sugar sand . any way i dug some up and planted it next to the fence !! very excited . anyone interested in some ,let me know !! there is allot of it .

On May 22, 2012, happy_girl from Redondo Beach, CA (Zone 10b) wrote:

When I received this plant, it was absolutely gorgeous. Beautiful strong stems and lovely green leaves. We put it in a small pot and watched it for a while. A few months later, we put it in the ground. Winter came and the leaves dropped off.

Since winter, I've been searching for growth. anywhere! We were just thinking of ordering another one when my DH called me yesterday to tell me he was about to pull it out of the ground when he spotted 3 tiny new leaves! YAHOO!

I am thrilled. I have seen this beautiful vine on the big island where it was framing a fence in all its glorious color and fragrance. I can't wait!

On May 20, 2012, popper1 from Lakeland, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

I have the double flowered variety. Sterile, does not set seed. Flowers a few times a year, smells just as wonderful as the single flowered form. Woody climber, FAST growing here in Florida, but obviously this form is not invasive.

On May 3, 2012, gardeninthesun from Lake City, FL wrote:

I have three Rangoon Creepers growing in my North Florida, zone 8B garden. I received them as divisions from my mother's 40 year old plant growing here also. The plants can grow very tall and the clumps do gradually enlarge, but they definitely are NOT invasive. In forty years my mother has only had one additional plant come up elsewhere in the yard.They do have to have something very large and sturdy to grow on. My mom's plant is trellised up the side of the house and climbs up and over the roof. Frost kills the plants to the ground but they come back reliably every year here, even when when we have multiple days of winter weather in the teens, and I have never even mulched my plants. The plants love full, hot sun, are not bothered by disease, smell divine, and are absolutely beautiful. I. read more f you have a place for a large vine, this is it!

On May 3, 2012, naturesown from Bolivar, NY wrote:

Hmmm. another fast-growing & spreading alien plant. Please read any number of some great new books on the market about native plants and how much more they are than pretty faces in our garden. Douglas Tallamy's book, "Bringing Nature Home" does it best when he explains the importance of native plants to our fragile ecosystem and how invasive plants have quickly (in earth age) changed and affected both native plants and the animals that depend on them. I can go on and on but, instead, I'll encourage all gardeners to educate themselves about how they can reverse the trend and 'Go Native"!

On May 3, 2012, lexipie from Huntsville, TX wrote:

I LOVE this vine! I bought one several years ago (Martha's Bloomers-Navasota) & it has done really well. It survived the first few winters without dying back at all. Then 2 winters ago, we had some snow & it died back to the ground. Thought it was dead & cut it off at ground level.Searched all over E Texas for another with no luck. However, the next spring, new shoots came up---much to my delight! This spring I dug it up to take to my new house. Only just planted it there but already seems to be settling in! Both locations has been full, hot afternoon sun & no supplementary watering. Fascinating to watch the flowers change color & the smell---mmm Heaven! Get one if you can!

On Apr 30, 2012, foodiesleuth from Honomu, HI (Zone 11) wrote:

I grew up with this plant growing in our back yard in our house in Cuba. I remember it as a fast grower but not invasive, as no little plants would spread around the yard. I now live in Hawaii and would love to have cuttings or seedlings or however it is best to get one started.

My BIL has one growing in his backyard in Miami and he keeps it controlled w/o too much trouble. His is using a dead starfruit tree as a climbing support. The plant did not kill the starfruit.

On Apr 30, 2012, Annie_Rooney from Tyler, TX wrote:

I live in East Texas. I'm not sure what the zone is. Not as cold as Dallas. I want an evergreen vine (not English ivy) that does not require a lot of sun. One post on Rangoon Creeper said it lost its leaves in winter. Another said it was evergreen. Does that depend on the species? Also, I have sensitive skin & would not be able to tolerate thorns. I would enjoy the blooms and the fragrance. Is it possible to order one that does not have the things that are negative for me?

On Apr 30, 2012, mlml from Penngrove, CA wrote:

This plant is a serious invasive pest in Florida. When gardeners say they have to cut it back frequently or it is covering their trees, that's a red flag. Gardeners should be aware that they will not be able to care for invasive plants forever, and that they can spread into wildlands, upsetting ecosystems, or end up a problem for neighbors in later years. Here in California, English ivy and Vinca are the poster children for what can happen.

On Nov 7, 2011, cocoloba from St John's,
Antigua and Barbuda (Zone 10a) wrote:

I love this plant, but it has only bloomed once in a year, can I get it to bloom more frequently?? I am zone 10b

On Oct 14, 2011, DOM from Pahoa, HI wrote:

I am growing Quisqualis indica in Pahoa, Hawaii (Hawaii Island). It is a delight. but something eats the leaves, primarily at night. Any thoughts as to who the eater might be?
Any thoughts as to how to stop the eater?
DOM
Pahoa, Hawaii

On Jun 7, 2011, robnix from Brenham, TX wrote:

moved to brenham from houston and brought this vine with me. brenham is 10 degrees colder than houston, and we have had 2 years of brutally cold (around 10 degrees farenheit.) for 2 years. this vine took awhile to come back from that, but in 1st of may it did and is now, june 7th, at the top of the fence loaded with blooms.it is fantastic. people stop and look at it from their cars.everyone should have it. i did not even try to protect it.

On Apr 28, 2011, adam7twiddle from Dallas, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Planted in a protected location against a house in Zone 8. I mulched it well and I was suprised to see it returned after the brutally cold winter we had with temps down to 13 degrees or so.

On Jul 23, 2010, Darmananda from New Iberia, LA wrote:

I grew up with this thing in Burma where it is native (we didn't have nurseries where you just went and BOUGHT plants).

I now live in Louisiana (what?) where I have never seen this plant on sale at any of our big box stores that sell anything they can imagine, including plants. So, I ordered this thing online - after learning what it was called in English so that I could Google it - and planted it in our Acadiana (Zone 9-B) garden. I planted this thing in Spring against a cloth-line pole (to hide it) and this thing climbed way too fast. Previously the cloth-line pole was made hidden by a jasmine vine which committed suicide last year.

Back to Rangoon Creeper, into summer, it is completely covered the cloth-line pole and want to climb onto trees and a window a. read more wning nearby. So it needs to be kept in check, making sure it doesn't climb where it is not supposed to. Just pull the vine down and direct it towards where you want it to be. This is an acid loving vine (anything that grew in northern Burma is) so I fed it bi-monthly with acid-loving water soluble plant food. Some viny branches grew so fat that I thought it was going to strangle me while I was fooling around with it near by. It is just beginning to bloom now (early summer). It should look spectacular once more flowers open up. The whole vine looks like it is going to be covered with flowers because it is full of buds. I will upload pictures soon, look for them. It was only planted (a baby plant) this spring (2010), and now (early summer, 2010) it has covered the whole of cloth-line pole and blooming! Flowers were white in the morning and turned pink an hour later and they're red by mid afternoon. What more can you ask for? I smelled my first flower today since Burma and the fragrance was as fruity as I remembered. I am also trying some butterfly gingers which are also native to northern Burma. Can't wait until they bloom (imagine the sweet intoxicating fragrant of the butterfly ginger flower!). I am also learning how to make perfume with flowers from my own garden. Will try when I get enough Rangoon Creeper blooms (two cups minimum, I think).

Yes, it is a weed if you let it grow wild, but if you are one of those people, you shouldn't really be planting this vine anyway unless you have a large uncultivated area. I will do my first pruning after this bloom cycle is done with. Give this vine enough sun and acid and you get glossy shiny leaves plus amazing flowers. I can't comment on its cold hardiness because it hasn't spent our winter here yet (once in a blue moon, the temperature here gets to the upper teens with wind-chill factor, but normally it stays above the freezing mark---hence, we're subtropic).

This vine can survive moderate amount of flood, if that is an occasional problem where you are. We have 5-month long monsoon season in Burma, so everything there must be flood-tolerant.

Update 8/6/10: Plant in full bloom now with more buds to open. The flowers have been staying on the plant for weeks without falling off. Great! Another thing I wanted to tell you was about the night-time pollinators: At dusk, I saw a hovering thing the size of a humming bird with a similar hover-motion on my Rangoon Creeper. Upon careful inspection and knowing hummers wouldn't be feeding at dusk, I realized, after reading some articles I found through Google search, that it was a sphinx moth. After I saw one, then I saw another, and another. They were still at it even when it got too dark for me to see them. Now I see them coming to my Rangoon Creeper flowers everyday, at dusk, so that explains why the fragrance strongest at night, to attract night time pollinators! I cannot, unfortunately, take pictures of these moths because like hummers, they never land on the plant, they hover and hover and hover, and since they are nocturnal, I neither have enough natural light nor appropriate camera/lens/lighting to take photos. But do please Google search on Sphinx Moths and you will learn all about them and see pictures. I hope you don't get freaked out by these harmless creatures, not knowing what they are. We need more pollinators with the amount of bee population we have been losing lately, and don't worry about the horn-worm caterpillars (which become sphinx moths as adults), the sphinx moths won't lay eggs on the Rangoon Creeper plant as it is not one of their host plants. If you can have a lot of extra ornamental peppers plant in your garden out of sight, they make great host plants for these beauties and I hope you welcome them in your garden. Have a happy gardening!

On Jul 23, 2009, FLOrlandogarden from Orlando, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I'm in search of a vine that will bloom all year for a wooden fence. I have a fairly small lot, so it needs to cling pretty tightly to the structure or be able to be trained or pruned to cling tightly. To the other Floridians who posted comments, how many months is the rangoon creeper in bloom? Do you have any other vine recommendations that will met this criteria? I am also considering the manettia cordifolia (firecracker) or the Mexican flame vine (senecio confucus). Thank you in advance for your insight.

On Sep 18, 2008, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant. Native to Tropical Africa, South Africa, Indonesia and Malaysia, Rangoon Creeper is deer and rabbit resistant. It may be propagated from stem cuttings, root cuttings (produces suckers) and by layering as well as by seed. Plants begun by seed are more bush-like when young and develop more of a vine-like habit as they age. Plants propagated from vining stem cuttings will grow more vine-like.

On May 12, 2008, mol1946 from Aransas Pass, TX wrote:

I found these beautiful blooms hanging from the beams of a hot house at a Corpus Christi nursery. The blooms were all over and so beautiful so I bought a plant. That was three springs ago. The first spring it grew but not much. The second spring it grew and grew but no blooms. Yesterday I noticed that it is about to bloom.

On Apr 8, 2008, Dinu from Mysore,
India (Zone 10a) wrote:

Till two days back, April 6, 2008, I hadn't noticed or even wondered what scent this lovely flower emanates. My DW called me just before dinner time to notice the brilliant fragrance in the front verandah. I was so happy to smell it. I confirmed that they are from there when I took my nose closer, out. Daytime, there is none noticeable. This must rank as one of the better ones for its scent at night.

On Sep 9, 2007, ronmybaby from Cedartown, GA wrote:

I bought two of these Rangoon Creeper Plants from Zone 9 Tropicals - the packing was great - the plants arrived in really great condition! They have grown alot, about 3 feet now in only a couple months. Can't wait to see flowers on it. I live in Northwest GA area so we will see how it does.

On Jul 17, 2007, caribayb from Tampa, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

I have had this in my yard for 7 years. it showed up the first spring after I bought my house and I didn't know what it was until Saturday when I saw it at the USF Tropical Plant show. I thought it was some sort of red jasmine, due to the heavy fragrance first thing in the morning. I'm glad I know what it is now. I've never fertilized or trimmed. It's growing up a viburnum bush behind my husband's woodworking shop. I guess I need to prune it, now that I know what it is and know that it could get out of hand. I've tried taking cuttings of it, but they've never rooted. It's one of my favorite signs of spring - once this blooms I know the daylilies are right behind!

On Sep 15, 2006, aprilwillis from Missouri City, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

I love this plant! The 1st year while getting established it wasn't all that but this second year it has bloomed constantly and grown quite a bit. Easy care, thrives on benign neglect more or less. The flowers smell great and they open white, turn pink and then finally red- what more could you ask for.

On Apr 26, 2006, rjuddharrison from Houston, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

I originally bought this plant at a garage sale at the beginning of my gardening days. I spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out what this plants requirements are. Over time I have learned that the plant blooms on new growth, so every year around Janurary though March I prune off all branches from the main trunk. While most web sites report no or little fertilizer is needed I learned through a local nursery a few years back to apply Hibiscus fertilzer granules. Indeed there was quite a difference. I have created a page in my journal including the analysis and where to find the Hibiscus fertilizer I use.

On Jul 30, 2004, AMAMAYI from Miami, FL wrote:

The name of Quisqualis indica is COCUISA in Dominican Republic and POIS ET RIZ in Haiti. It is an astringent the bark rich in tannin is use in potion for diarrhea.

On Jul 8, 2004, klkruger from Okeechobee, FL wrote:

This plant is available from TopTropicals.com. Took me a while to locate one as they're not available in area nurseries (but, then again, nothing unusual is). I just got one to try in Okeechobee, Florida. I had one in Miami Beach and it covered my screen room. A favorite of mine.

On Jul 7, 2004, gagesgranny from Lakeland, FL wrote:

I planted this plant about 5 yrs ago, didn't know its name or anything about it. It's on the east side and gets full sun the only water it gets is when I water the lawn or it rains. And yet it continues to thrive. Drought or cold doesn't seem to bother it. I have to cut it back several times. I would love to have more but have not been able to find another.

On Jun 28, 2004, Indigoez from Floresville, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

I've had one of these for three years outside in zone 8b and while it loses all of its leaves in the winter is always returns and is quite beautiful, although it does have a tendancy to creep over everything in sight, which I guess is where it got the name creeper.

On Jun 26, 2004, mhatt53 from Clearwater, FL wrote:

I bought what was labeled as rangoon creeper at a garden show last winter after the ladies there raved about its fragrance & beauty. I planted in the ground months ago & it has hardly grown at all, as if it is just 'on hold' at about 4' tall. It gets afternoon sun & I water frequently.

On Apr 20, 2004, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

I grew the Rangoon Creeper more than 30 years ago. A hard freeze killed it, and I've never found another. The fragrance covered the entire yard.

Not mentioned here - as far as I can tell, all of the photos shown except for the last one are of the Quisqualis Indica Rangoon Creeper 'single'.

The last photo (by Chamma) is of the Quisqualis Indica Rangoon Creeper 'double' which has thicker leaves in addition to the profusion of double blooms.

On Dec 16, 2002, Chamma from Tennille, GA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Quisqualis is a wonderful evergreen vine with large leaves and clusters of very long tubed white,pink and red flowers all on the same vine. The fragrance is very heady and sweet. The vine should be trimmed once a year after blooming for they become huge. In Dubai, UAE the rangoon creeper starts blooming in November until March. (zone 11)

On May 21, 2002, leoi95 from Miami, FL wrote:

I live in Miami, Florida (U.S.) and I noticed this vine almost covering one of my small trees. I identified it as a Rangoon Creeper (which originates from the Pacific Islands, China, Thailand, Vietnam, etc.) I believe the seed may have been dropped by a bird because I've lived here 53 years and have never seen any other Rangoon Creeper vines in this area. The flowers are in bunches, each blossom on a 3" long stem. The petals open white, turning to red.

It appears the vine could be very invasive, so I am going to see to it that it stays right here where I can control it.


Q. rangoon creeper

I live in Thailand. This is now December and the leaves are shedding. Do I need to cut it back to regenerate growth?

Yes, you can cut back your Rangoon creeper now to propmote future flowering. If the plant is growing too large, you can also trim it back at any time of year.


Rangoon Creeper Double - Creepers & Climbers

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Rangoon creeper Botanically known as Combretum indicum from Combretaceae family. Common name are Rangoon creeper, Burma creeper, Chinese honeysuckle, Madhu Malati, Rangunachavel, Rangoon-ki-bel, Lal Malti, Irangunmalati, Radha manoharam etc. It is a perennial evergreen flowering vine & it requires trelling or chain like fencing for growing over it. It can be grown in big pots/containers and it is a double petal with fragrant flowers.

A beautiful tropical climber. Its mild fragrance and ease of growing make it popular & also p lanted near temples - especially in South India. Clambering shrub with soft light green wirey Read More

Rangoon creeper Botanically known as Combretum indicum from Combretaceae family. Common name are Rangoon creeper, Burma creeper, Chinese honeysuckle, Madhu Malati, Rangunachavel, Rangoon-ki-bel, Lal Malti, Irangunmalati, Radha manoharam etc. It is a perennial evergreen flowering vine & it requires trelling or chain like fencing for growing over it. It can be grown in big pots/containers and it is a double petal with fragrant flowers.

A beautiful tropical climber. Its mild fragrance and ease of growing make it popular & also p lanted near temples - especially in South India. Clambering shrub with soft light green wirey stems that later turn woody, it have pubescent(hairy)leaves. Interesting about this plant is beautiful fragrant flowers with petals, it is red when in bud and opens as white but later changes to pink.

MAXIMUM HEIGHT - It can reach more than 12 meter height.

BLOOMING YEAR - Year-around flowering with fragrance.

GROWING TIPS - It can grow almost in all type of soil and it can easily grown in any Indian Climatic condition.

  • Plants grow very quickly and should be given a strong support to climb on.
  • For fast growth it needs support, the more support it will grow very quickly.
  • It can grow either in full sunlight or partial sunlight is also okay to grow.
  • For lush green & bushy appearance better to plant it directly in the soil.
  • After 15 days you can transplant it into your permanent location in full bright light condition.
  • Its a popular climber in tropical garden, hardy, quick growing, needs strong support as plants are long lived.
  • It can also grown in bushy condition, if planted in pot and by regular pruning.

S.No. PRODUCT NAME DIMENSION
1. Rangoon creeper Double petal 1-2 Feet Height
2. Growing Pot (Black color) 6 Inch

*above specifications are for indicative purpose only, actual dimensions may slightly vary.

LIGHT CONDITION - It requires minimum more than 3 hours of Direct Sunlight. If planted in full shade the blooming frequency will reduced.

WATERING SCHEDULE - Water when the top soil(2-3 inch) feels dry to touch. Always maintain moisture near the root zone.

SOIL TYPE - The soil should be well drained, fertile & rich in organic content.

FERTILIZER APPLICATION - Initially upto 1 year apply any organic fertilizer once in a month. After that apply 2-3 times in a year.

PLANT PROTECTION - Do regular pruning of the plant in order to maintain good required shape. Remove dead, infected or damaged plant parts and discard them away from the plants. Generally it is not affected by any pest & disease incase for any insect attack or disease, you can use Neem oil, Eucalyptus oil or Citrus oil spray for primary treatment.

INITIAL CARE FOR 10-15 DAYS JUST AFTER RECEIVING YOUR PLANT

  1. Remove the Packaging Materials carefully.
  2. Press the soil in the pot & add additional soil(garden mix) if necessary.
  3. Maintain moisture in the pot, Do not over water it may kill your plant, so make sure that the soil should be dry between watering.
  4. Provide support with stick/moss stick(vine plant) in order to make straight growth, for needed plant only.
  5. Make sure that plants get enough morning direct bright light for 10-15 days & do not go for immediate transplanting(minimum 1 month)
  6. Just prune if any branch of the plant is get damaged in transist. New leaves will come very fast.


Help needed with my Rangoon Creeper

I have two beautiful Rangoon Creeper Vines. They bloomed well for three years. They are on 8 foot trellis and planted in 20" pots, they grew well last year but not one flower. I fed with MG as I had the year before. I did pot up to a larger pot last spring, but just because the roots were growing out the bottom of the smaller one. They got Morning sun last year. Does anybody have an idea how to get them to start blooming again. I think the year before they got afternoon sun but wilted soooo bad in the afternoon. I have not pruned them.

They are in the basement now and will be ready to go out in a couple of weeks. We are having some beautiful weather so I will move them out for a few days.

this is just a guess as i havent grown them but some plants dont like to be transplanted and instead of flowering that year they reastablish them selves. i have a honeysuckle that i moved when we moved and its just now flowereing the second year after the move.

I hope that is the problem. They sure did put on a lot of new growth last year.

Picabo, I don't think repotting is what caused them to stop blooming.
Imzadi's honeysucke is a perennial and they do resent being transplanted but our rangoon creeper's are tropical. They are going to respond to what we do for them pretty much right away.
Last yr mine looked awful at the end of winter in my g house.
I repotted it in a pot that let me place 4 inches of fresh potting mix in the bottom. Right away it started growing new stems and setting buds at the branch tips.
I had 3 flushes last yr. Now it looks awful again in the ghouse so I am going to lift
it up and give it another 2 inches of fresh mix. I dont feed very often and mine only got 2 to 3 hrs of dappled sun each day last season
Try lightly pruning back just the tips or any branches that look bad
when you set it out or just before you place it outside. Mine bloomed on new growth last yr. I fed it just a little time release granules and a small amt of 15-30-15 every 3rd watering or so. Try
not to overfeed as that MIGHT have caused new green leafy growth only.
Just speculation on my part. Trial and error is the best teacher.

Thanks Jackie. I used a time release fertilizer last year plus I would spray with a light mix of MG every 2 weeks. It was so lush I probably did over feed. Right now it looks pitiful, but I am sure it is about ready to grow. It can use a few inches of soil in the top of the pot I will do that this week before time to go out.

Yes, I agree with Jackie.
I use granules, its actually designed for Bougenvilla by Nutra Star- they really seem to love it.
I usually fed every month, twice a month during blooming.
At the beginning of each season, I take off all of the branches from the main vine, as they only bloom on new growth.
--p.s. repotting seems to be an issue in my experience with Rangoon Creepers. This one in the picture, is in a pot- but I allowed the roots to grow through. It made me wonder if they like to be root bound.
Rj

This message was edited Mar 13, 2006 7:21 PM

RJ. Beautiful. On my "Creepers" best day they NEVER looked like that.

I am going to go cut it back tonight. Wish I had not put it in such a big pot. I went up about 2 sizes. The roots are filling the pot, but far from being root bound.

I will look for those granules this week.
Thanks for the wisdom.

Sure, it took me a while - but finally got it. I/ve re-potted 2 rangoon creepers, and I/ve always gone up too high I thought on the pot size- But as soon as it starts getting warm, it will perk up. I trimmed mine in January, and its just now starting to shoot out new branches. They seem to like it hot and humid. When the temp reaches a sustained 80 degrees..they really start growing fast.
Good luck to ya!

Mine has already put on alot of new growth. it was "heavily" and I do mean heavily muched also, I hacked it back a week ago.

RJ--why a pot in Houston? I'm on far west side and everyone I know grows it in the ground---warning. they get huge in the ground.

Picabo--they do best in full (all day) sun down here. Not blooming, would probably indicate not enought sun. The fertilizers I use are all organic (seaweed and fish emulsion) so can't say if thats a problem. It also likes a lot of water down here in our heat.

This message was edited Mar 14, 2006 3:15 PM

Well it was a chain of accidental events. The plant came with the pot, I bought at a garage sale, before my knowledgeable gardening days. I moved that pot all over the yard as I progressed in gardening. I put in a pond, where I had a bunch of potted plants including the rangoon creeper. I moved it next to the garage, where it grew through the pot- so I just left it alone. I had to take a hammer to the pot this last fall because the vine had grown so huge.
I have one in the front yard too. I cut every branch off of it in Jan, and now it is sprouting branches everywhere- They are liking our rather warm winter this year. We should have some showy blooms again. How come your zone shows 8b in Houston?

Yes..I noticed the rangoons are drinkers. the problem in that area is when they are repotted - in a cooler zone- they stay pretty wet- but yes full sun is a must..and it seems the hotter it is the better they like it.

I am so happy that I asked!!

They bloomed well year before last, even when the summer sun wilted them down. I thought moving to the shade would help. Wrong! Well it did grow nice and thick last year. Maybe with all of the help I can get it to bloom again this year.

Lets see, what other problems can you help with. :

I tell ya it was a learning experience for me. I luckily stopped by a nursery down the stree from me called -another place in time- and they had the rangoon creeper growing and blooming in abundance- so I asked..how the heck do you get it to bloom so much? she said- Bougenvilla food granules. I have to admit, last years blooms was the most I have ever seen any rangoon creeper bloom. It was a very rainy spring- then dry until July. I am sure that there are several different strains running around out there- Some repeat bloomers, some once a year bloomers.

Did you know that if you have a plant that is dying from overwatering- you can use Hydrogen Peroxide or H202 for short (yep that stuff under the sink somewhere) to save the plant.
There is a whole thread on it here at DG- Some people use it in regular watering even for potted plants. The H202 delivers oxygen to the plants roots that are basically drowning from the water.
I use it for propagating seeds and cuttings- I love this place..I never would have thought of this in a hundered years. I have a whole section in my journal devoted to using different things to assist your plants- I have alot of links to information about food grade H202 and aspirin.
Have a look - http://davesgarden.com/journal/ed/index.php?tabid=1923

RJ--it says 8b because I'm in 8b--north hwy 6--gets colder here in the winter than down in town.

Mine bloomed like crazy on seaweed and fish emulsion. They don't need much help to bloom if they are in full sun and good soil.

OK I am having "Zone Envy" again. LOL

Picabo--we start envying your zone (or any zone cooler than ours) come August and September!

Yeah, in town here..our winter was really spring- so I hate to see what spring will bring!

My fear is what August will be like--if we don't get some rain soon the xeriscapers may be the only ones with gardens left!

It's not pretty here in August. That is usually when I tell the bugs.

"OK, you won! Eat what you want, I am going to the Air conditioning." LOL

I hear we are suppose to get T-Storms tomorrow.

True during August. too hot and bugs galore.
I think we are in for a pestilence year- I have already seen powdery mildew

RJ That's the largest, most impressive Rangoon Creeper I've ever seen.
The photo speaks for itself.

Thanks- It went wild last year-
I think it's a slightly different breed, as I noticed mine in front - flowers are bigger, but don't bloom in as much profusion. Then again. is it because the roots were bound in the pot, and grew through? All sorts of questions that presents to us . why?

RJ, wish I knew the answer. My creeper is rootbound every spring
and just sits there sulking, not doing anything until I repot it and move'it out of the g house. So mine is not a stress bloomer, instead preferring fresh mix to grow, ample water and some food. Then what happens is amazing, putting out new stems and forming flower buds at the branch tips all at the same time.
I had 3 flushes of bloom last season. The new flush would not start until the old one had pretty much run it's course. Your vine has all stages
at the same time, different colors, seeds and the whole 9 yards. I think
you can say your flowers are prolific. LOL
Googled rangoon creeper last yr and I think I found a website that showed more than one strain of this vine.

I was looking on a web site last year and saw that there are double ones also. Maybe if I can get these blooming again I can consider another one.

I moved mine outside Monday. It is already starting to put on buds. I am sure that it will have to go back in but can at least enjoy a few days outside.

Mine's a double--will post pics when warmer and it starts to bloom.

Ok, Now it is not Just "Zone Envy" its "Creeper Envy" too. LOL Can't wait to see pics.

hmmm..I wonder where that web site is. I notice a difference in the size from the one in front and back. The one in front the flowers are bigger, but fewer in a clump- the one in back..well you saw that. I also notice the one in front will have floweres that have stripes in them. Never saw that on the one in back.

Here is a view of it, and how far back it went. It went back by the red umbrella, and what we can/t see is it goes up equally as high.

That's amazing RJ. Tonight when I get back to my computer, will
look for the web site.

What you have that rangoon rambling on? And where have all those plumeria been all winter? Nice yard! Can I come over? lol Are you down inside the loop?
Debbie

What you have that rangoon rambling on? And where have all those plumeria been all winter? Nice yard! Can I come over? lol Are you down inside the loop?
Debbie

hahaha. Yes last summer was quite a good bloom on the Rangoon..best ever. The plumerias were in the green house - I just started dragging them out again. They look like they need to e resucitated. A 100 year old Pecan tree landed on my deck, car, house during hurrican Rita, and wiped out half of the plumerias, brugmansias. but nature is forgiving and everything is growing back pretty good. I have a trellis on the side of the garage the rangoon climbed, then it went to the crepe myrtle and sprawled into some brug trees.
Come on down..I live in the Heights- I move plants around that yard like furniture. I leave about 15 percent of the yard in big pots so I can do that. That was because there was a huge pecan tree next door and I had to drag those plants around as the sun changed through the spring/summer. This will be my first season with alot of sunshine coming in. The back yard is already become Jurrasic. I posted some pics I took this morning on Tropicals threads.

Your yard is beautiful. Please don't tell me that is a picture from this year. LOL My poor Plumerias don't have leaves yet and we may get a freeze this week.

RJ--I used to teach at Hamilton Vanguard--the butterfly garden I created there would not freeze and my plants (same ones) at my house would freeze down to the ground. Amazing how just a few miles west will do crazy things with plants!

Picabo--I know what you mean! My plumies are still "sticks in their pots" in the washroom. Still not real warm every night here yet although I guess in the last two weeks it has been above 50 degrees.

Oh noo. nope..that was last april or may..My plumerias are looking leafless too. As a matter of fact I just dragged them out this last weekend. They are next on the list to be planted. I think Im going to put a few of them in the front where I just re-landscapped.
. When I was in Hawaii a couple weeks ago, their plumys looked the same as ours..no leaves. I guess they drop their leaves during the winter. So we all shant feel too bad! I guess there is quite the Plumeria society here in Houston.
I started putting lava sand in the potting soil ..the plumerias Looooooove it. There is a place called Southwest Fertilzer on chimney rock and bissonett. they have quite the comprehensive list of things for the garden.

Rj, all I could find after googling was references to the single and double forms. This must be what I had found last yr.
Top Tropicals does mention the white and/or pink stripe bloom before turning solid pink then red.
http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Quisqualis_indica.htm
Rare flora shows pics of the double and single form
http://www.rareflora.com/quisqualisindouble.htm
http://www.rareflora.com/quisqualisindsingle.htm

Okay. I will take a look. I am curious what constitutes a double.

I love Tops tropicals. I bought an easter lily vine in Jan. and it/s getting ready to bloom

Okay..mine must have been a double. I just went out to look at it today..I think I lost the vine over winter..because of that pot..the root plugged up the hole..and I had to take the hammer to the pot, but must have been too late. I think I/m going to be sick.
I had been trying to propagate it from cuttings..but have been successful only twice.

If its blooming. how can it be dead? Or am I confused as usual. I try to stay that way it makes life easier.

They are tough, maybe it is just dormant. Mine looks so bad right now but I see little buds. Sure hope it is OK.

Betty--try something kinda mild like an 8-8-8 liquid in a watering can on it maybe half strength. It surely can't be gone. maybe just "ailing". LOL
Debbie


Rangoon Creeper - Creepers & Climbers

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Rangoon creeper Botanically known as Combretum indicum from Combretaceae family. Common name are Rangoon creeper, Burma creeper, Chinese honeysuckle, Madhu Malati, Rangunachavel, Rangoon-ki-bel, Lal Malti, Irangunmalati, Radha manoharam etc. It is a perennial evergreen flowering vine & it requires trelling or chain like fencing for growing over it. It can be grown in big pots/containers and it is a single petal with fragrant flowers.

A beautiful tropical climber. Its mild fragrance and ease of growing make it popular & also p lanted near temples - especially in South India. Clambering shrub with soft light green wirey stems that later turn woody, it have pubescent(hairy)leaves. Read More

Rangoon creeper Botanically known as Combretum indicum from Combretaceae family. Common name are Rangoon creeper, Burma creeper, Chinese honeysuckle, Madhu Malati, Rangunachavel, Rangoon-ki-bel, Lal Malti, Irangunmalati, Radha manoharam etc. It is a perennial evergreen flowering vine & it requires trelling or chain like fencing for growing over it. It can be grown in big pots/containers and it is a single petal with fragrant flowers.

A beautiful tropical climber. Its mild fragrance and ease of growing make it popular & also p lanted near temples - especially in South India. Clambering shrub with soft light green wirey stems that later turn woody, it have pubescent(hairy)leaves. Interesting about this plant is beautiful fragrant flowers with petals, it is red when in bud and opens as white but later changes to pink.

MAXIMUM HEIGHT - It can reach more than 12 meter height.

BLOOMING YEAR - Year-around flowering with fragrance.

GROWING TIPS - It can grow almost in all type of soil and it can easily grown in any Indian Climatic condition.

  • Plants grow very quickly and should be given a strong support to climb on.
  • For fast growth it needs support, the more support it will grow very quickly.
  • It can grow either in full sunlight or partial sunlight is also okay to grow.
  • For lush green & bushy appearance better to plant it directly in the soil.
  • After 15 days you can transplant it into your permanent location in full bright light condition.
  • Its a popular climber in tropical garden, hardy, quick growing, needs strong support as plants are long lived.
  • It can also grown in bushy condition, if planted in pot and by regular pruning.

INSIDE THE BOX

S.No. PRODUCT NAME DIMENSION
1. Rangoon creeper Plant 1-2 Feet Height
2. Growing Pot (Black color) 6 Inch

*above specifications are for indicative purpose only, actual dimensions may slightly vary.

LIGHT CONDITION - It requires minimum more than 3 hours of Direct Sunlight. If planted in full shade the blooming frequency will reduced.

WATERING SCHEDULE - Water when the top soil(2-3 inch) feels dry to touch. Always maintain moisture near the root zone.

SOIL TYPE - The soil should be well drained, fertile & rich in organic content.

FERTILIZER APPLICATION - Initially upto 1 year apply any organic fertilizer once in a month. After that apply 2-3 times in a year.

PLANT PROTECTION - Do regular pruning of the plant in order to maintain good required shape. Remove dead, infected or damaged plant parts and discard them away from the plants. Generally it is not affected by any pest & disease incase for any insect attack or disease, you can use Neem oil, Eucalyptus oil or Citrus oil spray for primary treatment.

INITIAL CARE FOR 10-15 DAYS JUST AFTER RECEIVING YOUR PLANT

  1. Remove the Packaging Materials carefully.
  2. Press the soil in the pot & add additional soil(garden mix) if necessary.
  3. Maintain moisture in the pot, Do not over water it may kill your plant, so make sure that the soil should be dry between watering.
  4. Provide support with stick/moss stick(vine plant) in order to make straight growth, for needed plant only.
  5. Make sure that plants get enough morning direct bright light for 10-15 days & do not go for immediate transplanting(minimum 1 month)
  6. Just prune if any branch of the plant is get damaged in transist. New leaves will come very fast.


Watch the video: एक बर जरर दख इस खबसरत बल क और जन लगन क तरक I


Comments:

  1. Tazil

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  2. Voodookasa

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  3. Faugar

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  4. Yozshugal

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